Why I’m Not Coaching for Beachbody

Why I'm Not Coaching for Beachbody

In the past few months, I’ve done a complete 180 when it comes to healthy living. I started exercising and eating right (for the most part…), and I shared the process on a fitness-focused Instagram account. I noticed it almost right away: these mysterious “virtual fitness coaches” saturating my feed with sweaty selfies and motivational quotes. And it didn’t take long, once my account started to gather a following, for these ladies to start reaching out to me with offers to become a coach myself. They didn’t always mention their employer outright, but I only needed a quick Google search to tell me that these women work for a multi-level marketing company called Beachbody. That’s right, the dreaded “MLM” — what some people refer to as a “pyramid scheme”. Yikes.

But the peppy posts and the promise of a rewarding, engaging, self-propelled career were getting to me. So I did a bit of research. 

Like any MLM, the premise of Beachbody is that its salespeople promote and sell its products to their social networks. In this case, it’s a collection of video series, a video-on-demand service, and a nutritional supplement called Shakeology. If you’re a human with a TV, then you’ve probably heard of the workout program P90X from the infomercials. That’s Beachbody. And if you’re involved at all with the fitness social media scene, then you might also have seen posts about Beachbody’s other programs like “Insanity”, “21 Day Fix”, or “Hammer and Chisel”.

Beachbody salespeople go beyond simply peddling their products. They also typically provide moral support to their clients via social media, making them “virtual fitness coaches”. Coaches pay a small fee for the infrastructure of their business (i.e. their personal Beachbody website, from which they earn a commission). But in order to successfully promote Beachbody from personal experience, coaches also need to buy into the programs themselves. Even at a seller’s discount, this can be a pretty pricey endeavour. This is how all MLMs work, so the startup costs were no surprise to me.

Then there’s the coaching recruitment aspect, which is pretty standard for an MLM as well. Whether it’s through commissions or bonuses, Beachbody encourages coaches to find others to join their coaching teams. This creates a structure (or upline) of coaches that provide business advice and support to newer team members. I have found it so interesting to see the wide variety of tactics current coaches have used to reach out to potential clients like me. It’s formulaic, but there’s definitely tons of room for personal flair.

So, am I turning down the opportunity to work for Beachbody as a virtual fitness coach because it’s an MLM, and therefore an evil company that wants to steal my money and take advantage of my friends and family?

Actually, no.

I already knew the basics about MLMs when I started looking into Beachbody. And I really liked the idea of promoting a healthy lifestyle and helping others achieve their goals, plus earning a revenue stream on the side. Obviously the startup costs are daunting, but I would cross the ROI bridge when I came to it.

The dealbreaker for me was actually the Beachbody products themselves. You heard the program names: “P90X”, “Insanity”, “Hammer and Chisel”. They’re high-intensity, hardcore, super-focused workouts intended to provide maximal results in minimal time. Some of them even come with meal plans to help you, ahem, “shred” or whatever.

Back when I joined Tone It Up, I mentioned that one of my favourite things about the program was that it was light, fun, and positive. Sure, there’s talk of being toned and lean. But the major focus is on creating a lifestyle that is sustainable in the long run. My fitness goals are a lot more about habit-forming than about “results”. And honestly, if the video has scary words like “Insanity” or “Max” in the title, I’m probably not going to try it — let alone stick to it!

I love promoting products that I believe in. (You’ll recall my NaNoWriMo obsession… my Agendio reviewpraise for my new Fitbit…) Unfortunately, I just don’t believe that Beachbody’s lineup of products would meet my current needs as a consumer, so I definitely can’t promote them as a coach.

That’s not to say that it won’t work for anyone! Do your research, watch the workout trailers on YouTube, and talk to coaches on social media. (Shoutout to Kate Rhue, a Beachbody coach who answered all of my annoying questions and is so passionate about her work as a virtual fitness coach! If you’re in the market for coaching, check her out!) But for now, I’m going to stick to Tone It Up for my fitness program, and earning an income the good ol’ fashioned way.

What are your thoughts on Beachbody?